It is currently Fri Oct 30, 2020 12:36 pm

All times are UTC




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 75 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 5:05 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 12:27 am
Posts: 29
Sensei wrote:
+Artistic integrity. I can't stand the thought of Disney owning a piece of Myst...


Disney and Myst:
You might be surprised then to know that the Myst novels were published by Disney. You might be surprised how much Disney owns and controls, even if they don’t stamp "Disney" right onto everything. Obviously Disney doesn’t own the rights to the Myst franchise, but at one time they seem to have been very interested in Myst. If you don’t believe me look up the Myst book series publisher. Also, the Riven "Making Of" video talks about how the Millers met someone who had participated in the development of the Aladdin cartoon for Disney in the 1990s and he came to be one of the development leads for Riven. At that time, Myst had been released and was the most popular and the best selling PC game of all time. That mainstream buzz seemed to fizzle out in the months/years after Riven was released and all of the fans anticipating Riven finally got their hands on it. The Millers and Disney signed the (maybe million dollar) book deal I’m pretty sure before Riven was released. It was when everyone, even those people who didn’t play video games, were still buzzing about Myst. Disney was also supposedly considering re-opening the now abandoned "Discovery Island" which is in a small in-land lake near the Magic Kingdom in Disney World and making it some sort of 'Myst Experience' where people would go around exploring as if they were in a Myst series environment.

MMOs need to keep bringing the money in by cost-effectively keep people playing/subscribing/purchasing:
Buy each age? Even a pay per age thing wouldn’t work because it doesn’t keep people paying on a regular basis. The benefit of a subscription is that the money keeps coming in if people keep playing. The one time purchase isn’t as attractive because once the product makes its rounds, everyone has it and no more money comes in until they make something new. Also, as someone in here mentioned, developing the ages probably cost a lot of money in comparison to a game like WoW which repetitively uses the game assets in new ways. Most of the landscapes and monsters in that game are the same models used for another area but with the colors changed. It's like the Super Mario 1 clouds which were the same as the bushes. Nothing about the Myst games has ever been repetitive and while that's realistic and amazing and ideal, it isn’t cost effective for an MMO. In the future, it’s probably more likely that MMO developers will just get better at doing what WoW does to the point where it won’t appear to you that they haven’t uniquely designed every area. An MMO should be like the old drug company example. Drug companies don’t prioritize researching a pill you have to take once that cures you, they want to research and develop medication(product) that you have to take every day for the rest of your life. It keeps them in business. That’s how things work unfortunately in a capitalistic society. I personally think that that is unethical because we’re talking about health human rights, but the game industry isn’t the pharmaceutical industry. We want companies like Cyan to keep making great games and we’re willing to pay for them if they figure things out.
I’m sure most of the people in these forums won’t agree with me because this forum is "inside of the box" so to speak. It's hard to think outside of the box when you're a fan. As far as WoW or Call of Duty fans not paying to stand around, think, and chat, that's exactly what I was talking about with Playstation home. On there, you have mainstream console gamers who have access to this free Home social mmo portal. Those people are all standing around and chatting and there isn’t anything to do. I think they'd jump at the chance to change the scenery and do something interesting.

Think of it in terms of product positioning. Here's an analogy to explain what I'm thinking. You can have the most amazing product and put it in the back corner of the store on a dusty shelf that few people walk by (less than ideal positioning/distribution/marketing). In that case there would still be the few people who find it and love it because, after all, it’s a great product. The ideal situation is putting it where people who want that type of product are travelling/looking/shopping. This is why many stores love to be in the mall. Higher traffic through your store ends up leading to more purchases than if they had been in a low traffic location. PlayStation Home is a high traffic location. GameTap was far from high traffic and didn’t even have a real community before URU. Uru was a game without an audience (aside from us, and we weren’t enough to pay the bills), and PlaystationHome is an audience without a game.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 6:23 am 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Wed May 10, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 2266
Zander - most of the QA/testing people got laid off - we read that here and in the Spokane paper.

Back to the topic - I don't disagree with Nath5000 that putting new things on the Playstation wouldn't be swell. And I disagree about Disney being uncreative. Much of Disney's work is wonderfully creative - heck, the best animators of a generation worked at Disney. I went to Disneyland for the 1st time last summer (never went as a kid, but went as an older adult!), Disneyland and California Adventure. I was amazed. Commercial does not mean bad, if you ask me.

Getting back to Cyan, when Cyan started making Uru, they didn't think it would fail - Myst was very successful. Cyan had money to fund a big long development project with lots of people. I remember those days - this was supposed to be a game that would bring in tons of people, not a small, little cult game - a big seller. But it didn't sell. Then, after multiplayer Uru was discontinued, the first time (Ubisoft), remember the series of solo player games, and then Myst V came out? Now, I wasn't privy to any financial stuff, even in my mod days, but don't you think that Ubisoft was paying them to make those games - perhaps there was even a contractual obligation.

Then, Cyan almost goes under (remember, all but a couple of people laid off, remember that?) and Gametap comes in and they hire their people back. This leads me to believe that Gametap paid them to develop Uru. Nath5000, do you think they should have let the company go under - walked away from the Gametap deal, and not been a company anymore? On the Ubisoft days - I'm assuming that Ubisoft paid them to develop the expansion packs and Myst V, and maybe there was a contractual obligation - don't know. Nath5000, do you think that Cyan should have not taken the Ubisoft money and gone under?

Now we are in present day. I don't know that much about the game industry, but I've been reading, I know a little If you join IGDA and get a subscription to Game Developer magazine and read forums you can get a bit of a handle on what's going on, like any industry. On Cyan, from everything that's been published, Cyan is very small now - I don't even know if they have artists on their staff. From what I've read, if you cut a deal with a publisher to make a big game, I think the publisher has to be convinced you have the resources and expertise to do it - having shipped successful titles in the last 2 years helps. We know that most Cyan developers have moved on - I think most of them are not in the area. And Cyan has never developed for a platform. I think Cyan would be super swell at it, but I'm a little biased in Cyan''s favor. From what I'm reading, wouldn't publishers want developers who already worked on platforms and had a staff experienced and ready to do the work?

I also think that Cyan thought about all kinds of options, before they got real tiny - why do you assume they didn't, Nath5000? When the community managers (don't remember if it was Chogon or Ryan) told us that Cyan was looking at other opportunities to develop games, they didn't say what games - but, guessing wildly here, I bet they thought about all kinds of games, maybe different multiplayer PC games, solo player PC games, and platform games. Maybe they thought about all kinds of games genres - casual games (quicker development times, but from what I've read a pretty competitive market), kids games, RPGs, simulations, maybe even shooters. We know they played other games - I remember reading that a bunch of Cyan folks were playing Dark Age of Camelot at the time. Why would you think that Cyan hadn't thought about this? Don't you think Cyan spent some of their time "thinking outside the box"? Now, Cyan never told us this, but guessing again here - if they would have gotten a big publisher deal, they would not have gotten real tiny. I don't think they gave up, not at all. We don't know what kinds of things they were thinking about, and what kinds of deals they were trying to make.

Finally - if you think about it - that iPhone thing is pretty swell. Sure, it's another version of Myst, but it's a whole different platform and a really popular one! Maybe that's bit of evidence that Cyan can develop on another platform - pretty smart! Maybe after this, a little original game on the iphone or another platform, adn then after that, who knows?

Long story, but Nath5000, I don't think you are telling Cyan anything they haven't thought of already.

_________________
mszv, amarez in Uru, other online games, never use mszv anymore, would like to change it
Blog - http://www.amarez.com, Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/amareze


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 10:37 am 
Okay, I've been out of the loop for a while and didn't know that. So maybe things are fairly dire. But your last line seems to me to sum it up. Cyan will be trying everything that they can and that they want to to carry on doing what they do. if they don't try this or that, then it will either be because they can't, with their lowered resources, or because they don't want to go that way. And if there are things they could do to arrest their decline, and they choose instead to do other things, I think we should respect that.

I don't think it signalises a lack of respect to describe them as "victims" of the economic mess--or if it does, then that applies to pretty much all of the rest of us on this planet. It was caused by the deliberate actions of a number of people and corporate entities, and Cyan has suffered by it.

It's hard for me to get enthusiastic about yet another version of Myst--it seems a little too much like some guy who had one hit in 1966, still going round clubs and pubs playing that one song to an audience of kids who weren't born then and trying to pretend he's still twenty. If they were porting Riven to any of these other new platforms as well, then maybe that would be a sign of hope...but one of the things about so many people having played Myst is that everyone who's played it knows it by heart by now, and everyone who hasn't pretty much isn't going to. If the graphics were really nicely updated, or if some of the puzzle elements (safe combination, ship raising code, and so on) had been changed to make them puzzles again, then that would be something, but I'm betting they haven't been, because that would take as much in the way of resources as designing a new game--and anyway, why bother for such a tiny screen? I'm seeing the awful spectre of "Myst on your microwave display" looming up ahead, and it felt like death throes even when I thought the company was doing okay. I'm glad they're doing something, but it doesn't feel to me like the thing that will work.


Top
  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 1:04 am
Posts: 4134
Nath5000 wrote:
I completely agree with you about tapping into the Myst (beyond uru) fanbase. We have to realize that the reason UBI and GameTap thought that publishing Myst sequels would be a good idea is becuase there is a massive fanbase who, if even a percentage buy the product, will make the publisher a nice profit. The original Myst game sold like crazy. There are a ton of people who played through Myst that never even tried URU or End of Ages, or even Riven or III or IV.

Some of that disparity between people who played Myst and its sequels might be because some (particularly Myst V) didn't have as much of the typical Myst appeal (because it was real-time 3d and not pre-rendered).

Quote:
I still cant accept that Uru going open source is a good thing. It's amazing for us fans but it cant be good for Cyan as a business unless they hope that an open source game will bring a lot more people into the fanbase for the Myst franchise and buy copies of the old games.

This is the possibility I see for Open Uru being good for Cyan. The source is released and people begin improving it. Updating it to more recent technology, adding features to the engine, etc. If it's done well, people come in to enjoy it and, just like with Until Uru, Cyan may be able to use that in a deal. Or shards may experiment with new ideas such as company-subsidized Ages, etc. I'm sure Cyan will use good ideas which come up in Open Uru if/when they have the potential to do so. Short-term, no, it's not a profit-making move for Cyan. However, I don't see much of an alternative which will be more successful. If they sit on the code, not thing gets done. If they sell the rights and allow another developer to design Uru, I think the fans (at least on here) wouldn't be as interested. Things connected to Uru don't really seem to have any other positive outcome other than open source.

Quote:
"What everyone else is doing" is making money. If Cyan doesnt follow the crowd in that regard then they wont succeed as a business.

Except pretty much every major game publisher I've heard of is losing millions.

Quote:
They dont have to make a Halo clone. Talking about Spore, Cyan made the cosmic osmo sequel, but it looked like a flop. It was poorly marketed. I wouldnt have even ever heard about it if I wasnt a Myst fan who visits Cyan Worlds homepage every once in a while. Cosmic Osmo is an example of a non-violent game, but it wasnt marketed well and probably wasnt innovative enough. I dont know becuase I havent played it. I've played the original but that's it.

Here's the thing, though. Only WoW, Halo, Spore, and Grand Theft Auto <number> are really big enough to get major media attention. Pretty much every game is only known by its fans. I didn't read about Civilization 3 before I got it. I saw it on the shelf and thought it looked nice. Secondly, Cosmic Osmo was marketed as far as I can tell. They had two videos regarding it (which I can't think were developed JUST for Youtube) and I saw articles on it on several gaming sites. I'm not an expert at marketing games, but I can't think of much else which wouldn't either seem tacky (The Cosmic Osmo FACEBOOK page! "Cosmic Osmo has friended you") or too expensive (theatrical trailers or Cosmic Osmo Happy Meal toys).

Quote:
Uru was a game without an audience (aside from us, and we weren’t enough to pay the bills), and PlaystationHome is an audience without a game.

Now, this is true, and, if it were possible, it'd probably be fine. The more the merrier, put Uru on every console platform, so long as they're all interconnected. If people want to take the time port the game, then by all means. But I think there are larger technical issues which could use that time instead.

_________________
-Whilyam
Cavern Link:My IC Blog


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 6:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 12:27 am
Posts: 29
@mszv
I dont think I ever said that the GameTap deal was bad for Cyan. That's great the Cyan had GameTap giving them the opportunity and they definetly shouldve taken it. Same for the situation with Ubi. The way it looks to me is that Ubi funded them to develop Uru, started testing it, and then realized that it wouldnt be profitable so they cut it short without giving it a chance. Then, GameTap thought they could make it work, but GameTap was the real world proof for Ubi's accepted hypothesis that Uru wouldnt be enough to be profitable.

My assumption that they didnt create any other options is based on the fact that Cyan is an industry acclaimed, highly talented, well known game developer. Creativity, artistic quality, creation of immersive experiences, these (and the ones I stated in my first few posts in this thread) are all assets that Cyan has. Despite this, many other developers still have funded development projects/contracts many that began after Cyan had nothing to do. Why? Maybe Cyan paid their employees too much? I dont know.

I think they were trying to think outside of the box. In everything I've said, I'm not assuming that they're a bunch of primates scratching their heads and not knowing what to do or what's going on. I know they're smart, creative, and talented people. My point in all of this is that the decisions they've made look like the primary reason why they're in the situation they're in now.

@mszv "Long story, but Nath5000, I don't think you are telling Cyan anything they haven't thought of already."
Its easy to assume that they've already thought of everything, but sometimes companies dont. Ive read case studies on many companies who were trying to figure things out, but they didnt make the right choices and ended up in trouble. It doesnt mean that they're a bunch of idiots. It just means that they needed to learn from their mistakes and go somewhere, but instead it looks like Cyan collapsed. That happens too. As a fan, I cant help but analyze their situation with whatever information we do know from our perspective. Like I said in another thread, it doesnt require full access to financial statements and eye witness accounts of all Cyan meetings to see the big picture of what decisions Cyan made and why they're where they are today.

@zander
It really doesnt have anything to do with respect. We all respect Cyan here. Aside from that, its obvious that what they did didnt work and they suffered the consequences.

@Whilyam "Except pretty much every major game publisher I've heard of is losing millions."
The economy is down, people arent spending. All consumer goods industries are suffering becuase of that. The point I was making is that Cyan isnt where it is just becuase of the economy. Cyan is where it is because of the decisions they've made. Even when the economy was better Uru didnt work. Uru probably wouldnt have worked, as it was, even if the economy was experiencing growth. An MMO needs a good and feasable business plan. Urus business model didnt work and wasnt feasable. It's easy for Rand Miller or a company offical to say that game companies are suffering becuase of the economy and Cyan was hit hard by it, but its really putting the blame onto something else and not taking responsibility for the results they've had. No company is going to come out and say "We made the wrong choices and suffered from it" thats bad PR. Think of all of the publishers in the game industry as a line graph. The game industry as a straight horizontal line is moving lower on the y axis because of the depressed economy. Cyan, as a part of that graph, is a point somwhere below the industry in terms of this situation. The economy may have contributed to their problems but the economy cant be blamed for all of them.

I'm not saying I know for sure that URU on PlaystationHome would be feasable or profitable, but it sounds like something worth looking into, something worth doing some market research or talking to someone at Sony Online Entertainment about. If the benefits and forecasted income stream outweighs the costs then it would be worth it. From a simple qualitative perspective, my perspective, it looks like it might fit with PlaystationHome. It looks like Ubi didnt realize that URU wasnt feasable or likely unprofitable until after they started beta testing. At that point they cut their losses and sold URU as a stand alone with expansion packs that were meant to be a part of URU's original online content.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:14 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 2:18 am
Posts: 1420
Quote:
I dont think I ever said that the GameTap deal was bad for Cyan. That's great the Cyan had GameTap giving them the opportunity and they definetly shouldve taken it.


Fact is that GameTap was a huge believer in Uru and Cyan Worlds, and had every intention of making it work. Things didn't happen though, mainly because GameTap themselves were suffering from cash flow problems, to the extent that they were eventually sold to a European company not long after Uru was closed. It was just another case of Cyan having their horse shot out from under them.

Mowog

_________________
MOUL KI: 174162

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:22 pm 
Offline
Creative Kingdoms

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 8:06 pm
Posts: 6235
Location: Everywhere, all at once
It's funny how Disney kept coming up. Disney is the company known for spawning the "Defenders of Mediocrity" (DoM) who allowed Disney to believe things were great during a period when they really weren't because everything was rationalized and nothing could be done wrong in the eyes of their fans. The DoM have come up before on these forums, so I won't go more into it.

Nath5000, you're making some rational and interesting points and not falling into reactionary argument without reason just for the sake of it. Not only do you have an argument in the positive sense, but you have a suggestion. The pairing of complaint with constructive suggestions - what do you want? - is always a good trait in my book. Thanks.

_________________
OpenUru.org: An Uru Project Resource Site : Twitter : Make a commitment.
Image


Last edited by JWPlatt on Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 12:27 am
Posts: 29
Mowog wrote:
Quote:
I dont think I ever said that the GameTap deal was bad for Cyan. That's great the Cyan had GameTap giving them the opportunity and they definetly shouldve taken it.


Fact is that GameTap was a huge believer in Uru and Cyan Worlds, and had every intention of making it work. Things didn't happen though, mainly because GameTap themselves were suffering from cash flow problems, to the extent that they were eventually sold to a European company not long after Uru was closed. It was just another case of Cyan having their horse shot out from under them.

Mowog


Thanks a lot for the insight. Well then I guess that explains the GameTap situation. Maybe Cyan has had nothing but bad luck, but I still cant make sense of the business model Cyan was trying to develop for Uru. Just from playing it, It didnt feel like regularly adding new ages would be enough. The ages were probably too expensive to develop too right? For the cost of developing one age, you'd need X many subscribers to make it feasable to develop and keep releasing them. Other MMO's keep people playing through grinding and leveling. Uru didnt have something that was as compelling as that "pull" to stay, pay and play the game, as other MMO's do. It doesnt mean Uru needed to have leveling or grinding, and thankfully it didnt. It just seems like it needed to be more than just an offline Myst game hosted on a server with other people joining together. Maybe it was supposed to eventually be more than that. Maybe Uru couldnt be build up to that point becuase it didnt have a fast enough growing or consistent subscriber base of X number of subscribers in order to bring in money for funding the development of expansion. That would be a flaw of the whole business model too, wouldnt it?

Either way, GameTap was suffering from cashflow problems. Was URU a positive cashflow contributor to their overall negative cashflow situation, or was it a part of their problem? Even if GameTap was suffering somehow, if URU was a positive cashflow financial contribution with a good outlook, why would they have dropped it? The only reason I can think of is that maybe Uru wasnt yet profitable, but maybe GameTap thought that once it was built up to what it was supposed to be it would turn around?

Thanks for the insight Mowdog. This is a really interesting situation to analyze. We want Cyan to succeed


Last edited by Nath5000 on Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:35 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:30 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 2:18 am
Posts: 1420
Quote:
It's funny how Disney kept coming up.


Guess they didn't bury him good enough...

:?

Mowog

_________________
MOUL KI: 174162

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 1:14 pm
Posts: 2598
Location: Israel
Zombie Disney :shock: .

Anyway, while we talk about uru (well, these ARE uru forums), I would be GLAD to see an update about Cyan Worlds, good or bad. I hate to be the whiner, but it had to come. Just a little bit? please? :o

_________________
Previously known as "The stranger"


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 9:13 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Wed May 10, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 2266
Interesting points! Nath5000, I think your replies to my posts are interesting.

To me - it boils down to the old "was there enough to do" thing that we are talking about, in another thread. I'm not sure you could call it a "business model" exactly, more a design model. If you listen to Rand Miller's last talk, he seems to be saying (and maybe I got it wrong) that they designed something that could not work - something where you could not produce enough content. Perhaps that's because you designed a world where the pull was new ages, and new content, all the time, but not enough to do with the new content. You designed a constantly updated TV show or a movie, instead of a game. If you don't want to kill monsters, you don't want that kind of repeatable content, and you don't want the reward of leveling, what else can you do?

Thinking about it - I guess that does translate to a business model. If you need a new age every month, and a lot of new "little things" every day, how can you do it? Theoretically, isn't this something they could have practiced in early testing, or even the beta, to see if they could get it to work? If you couldn't get it to work, perhaps that would have been the time to walk away.

I also think that the model may have been how people played Myst. There wasn't a lot to do in Myst, but I think that how people play solo player games is different, and I think that back in the 1990s (1980s can't remember) people seemed to have been happy with less content. It was OK that getting through Myst took months. By the time we get to 2005, the fabric of gameland, the fabric of multiplayer games is different. Was their plan based on a different model, where people were OK with less to do?

On the money part - Nath5000 - and Gametap and Ubisoft, I think that Cyan and Gametap and Ubisoft did post some stuff on that - not specific financial statements, but how well Uru was doing, in general, sort of finacial terms. I'll have to go see if I can find it.

_________________
mszv, amarez in Uru, other online games, never use mszv anymore, would like to change it
Blog - http://www.amarez.com, Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/amareze


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 9:54 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Wed May 10, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 2266
Short post

MMO Uru's cancellation by Ubisoft - I can't find the original announcement - I had to find a copy of a copy. The first is the "in character" announcement. Scroll on down to read the official announcement.

http://www.eblong.com/zarf/uru/rj/cyan-letter.html

The reason was that there were not enough subscribers. I vaguely remember it being projected subscribers, but I'll have to go dig around and see if I can find any evidence for that. I thought (won't know for sure until I find some evidence in terms of old official posts) that Ubisoft didn't expect Uru to make money, right out the door, but the projected number of subscribers did not match what they needed to be successful. Maybe I can dig around enough to find the old Ubisoft Myst Online forums.

Gametap cancellation - I don't think they said specific reasons, instead "business reasons". Here's the Rickzilla thread from Gametap. I have to go back and find his original announcement. The postings at Ten Ton Hammer were also good.

http://www.gametap.com/forums/thread.js ... 0&tstart=0

Ricardo Sanchez (VP of Content and Creative Director for Gametap) interview with TenTonHammer -
http://www.tentonhammer.com/node/21747
From what I can gather, not enough subscribers, but it's hard to tell more than that. Rick's careful in what he is saying, as a good publisher would be, so I don't think you'll be able to get more info than that. You can't tell if Gametap wanted enough subscribers to make money, or they wanted to look at subscribers in terms of projections - and see if they were gaining enough subscribers to make it worth it to keep Uru.

_________________
mszv, amarez in Uru, other online games, never use mszv anymore, would like to change it
Blog - http://www.amarez.com, Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/amareze


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 12:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 1:04 am
Posts: 4134
The strength of the reasons for Ubisoft canceling Uru are in some debate, if I remember right. The rumor being that Ubisoft was basing its numbers off the number of people interested in the open beta. I've even heard that people held off joining the open beta back then because they were waiting for the finished game. So I don't think that it's as simple as "there were never enough subscribers."

_________________
-Whilyam
Cavern Link:My IC Blog


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 4:19 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Thu May 25, 2006 12:55 pm
Posts: 9852
Location: Luton, UK
Quote:
I've even heard that people held off joining the open beta back then because they were waiting for the finished game.
Another group of people held off because they were playing the off-line game and wanted to import a finished game.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 4:20 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 2:00 am
Posts: 1669
Location: Lakewood, WA
I thought it had more to do with the limitations of the game enviroment. Ubisoft seeing early on that there was a limit to just how much could be added before the game enviroment was max'd out and an the excess of hardware to keep up with it.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 75 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: