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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 7:46 pm 
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I don't usually step into any forum discussion, as shown by my post count. I have to step in here. This discussion is probably one of the best I have ever seen on the forum. Many opinions, and the entire thread is written in a calm, and respectful manner. I just have a few things I want to ask about those who are here and bring some other things up too.

The word community has been brought up many, many, many times in this thread. But in a way, I feel as though we have forgotten who the community is. Is the community the Uru Obsession forums, the MOUL forums, and the DRC forums? No, it is not the forums that are the community. The game is the community, which spreads out into forums. We seem to have it the other way around. It also seems to me, from several posts here, that people aren't logging into the game anymore purely because, people aren't logging into the game and the "community" isn't there. . Is that in some way ignorant of the once again stated community we have created? We have all formed our own little groups, some participating in other ways. At this point Uru has become a new Zork, a text adventure on internet forums. We are the community. If you're looking for the community, you yourself as part of it need to login and bring YOUR part of the community into the game.

While yes, I have to agree expectations for different people were at different locations all the way through. Sometimes lowering, sometimes being raised to the next bar. I for one am perfectly pleased at the content, but where has my beloved uru community gone? They have fallen to the forums. As of last night, one year ago, we were all partying in hoods on uru in large groups ringing in the new year. I logged in last night and saw about 12 people online, none of which seemed to be celebrating anywhere. Yes, it was the die hard uru fans known to be seen in the cavern, but I think that is because they realize people need to be there, for more people to be there. By saying "I'm just not going to go into uru because everyone is on the forums" is a travesty to uru and you are betraying the community that you have taken part in.

There has also been some discussion as to if this is uru's last hoo-rah. What if it is? Are you going to sit on the forums and post back and forth about it, or are you going to get into that game and party, see your friend's avatars, make new friends and do as much as you can with as little or as much time as you have in uru. I think what we as a community have forgotten over the last year is that we are infact a community all relying on each other to make this game what Cyan wanted it to be which was a growing and ever changing community and game. We can't only rely on Cyan to feed us new things, we need to also rely on our friends because without friends and other people, uru would just be a single player game. We all complain how sometimes it has become a "virtual chat room" because that is what we have made it. Make it a virtual party room, or think bigger than what anyone can type here. None of us wish the worst for uru. Lets stop saying Cyan is doing the best they can with what they have, and lets start saying we're doing the best we can with what we have. We all know what Cyan has been able to give us, but do we know the extent that we can use that?

From what we've heard about the possible season 2 it is going to be up to us more than ever to create and move the story along. So please, close your internet browser and just login to the game and see your friends as well as the rest of the unknown people in the game.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 7:54 pm 
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Wow.

That is probably one of the best posts I've ever read.

/me closes IE and heads to the cavern

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 8:06 pm 
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 8:08 pm 
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Zardoz wrote:
From public statements and comments made by various Cyan people, this design decision seems to reflect a desire to have Uru be as "real" as possible (although why it is unreal to write journals is not obvious to me). The effect of this is as you describe, but the distinction between design and effect is important if you think of Uru not as a game but as an artistic endeavor to create a realistic environment, in which case design (or the artist's intent) is more important than effect.


I completely agree. But in all their previous games they have admittedly taken artistic liberties to provide better gameplay. Now with Uru they have consistently sacrificed gameplay (or if you'd like to word it positively 'refused to compromise') for the sake of an artitistic vision that has proven to alienate their playerbase. Was it worth it? Is the perceived 'reality' of the story such a lofty artistic ideal to leave your audience behind?

To continue with the analogies, imagine us as being the messengers of our sentiment that this choice means ruin.

EXT (INT? *g*) Takohta Alley by the very edge.

UruPlayer: But this is madness!
Cyan: Madness? THIS IS URU!

(Cyan kicks UruPlayer to plummet into the lake below)

That is pretty much exactly how the past developments have felt to me. It is not just because of limited resources. Time and time again, they have chose to stick to their specific artistic vision, developing it not for, but despite of the players.

Erik wrote:
He indeed said that he personally felt like that, but he didn't say that Cyan as a company had no plans to do so.


Fair enough. But he is one of the key designers involved. It's not the Uru years ago, which had a huge team working on it. If you listen carefully, he is trying to be very political in his responses and very guarded, which I can appreciate considering the impact careless statements could have. However, if Cyan felt very differently about this, he would have stated it in another way. Finally though, one more thing becomes apparent from his words and the way they are delivered. Don't you think it's sad that he feels he has to be so defensive?

JWPlatt wrote:
I believe I am qualified to say that like the Great Zero, Cyan knows exactly how the lake project should work. But financial and schedule realities have interfered with both these and other projects. The result is the phrase we know so well: they do the best they can with what they have.


Well, that is why I was careful to note it as my interpretation, not their words. I don't know for sure. However, I cannot accept the 'tight budget' response in apology anymore. It's the same with the non-interactive control in the pods. You simply do not put something like that in, in the hopes it will keep people occupied engaged in a meaningless activity, when you know they will find out. Their repeated choice to do this is what makes the situtation worse, that frustrates people even more. Nobody likes to be led around by the nose. It's cruel.

They should have learned after the first time, that it's better not to put something in at all if it doesn't quite work the way it should, or is at least somehow fun to see it not working.

JeffeJ5005 wrote:
The word community has been brought up many, many, many times in this thread. But in a way, I feel as though we have forgotten who the community is. Is the community the Uru Obsession forums, the MOUL forums, and the DRC forums? No, it is not the forums that are the community. The game is the community, which spreads out into forums.


I appreciate your positive attitude JeffeJ5005, and a very nice post at that. However, I disagree. The game is not the community. This community has existed long before Uru in many different forms throughout AOL groups, forums, and most close to my heart, The Lyst. I have made many friends in the community over the years and had much great discussion. We are a community because we share a common love for Cyan's creations. Uru is just one game in a list of several that has had us come together.

Also, I am not logging into Uru because I wish to attend some kind of gathering or party. While I can appreciate that some people love that aspect of Uru, I log in to experience a game and its story. If there are other people along for the ride that's quite nice.

I do not accept Uru as just a pretty chat room. If that's what it is now, its not for me. I'll much rather stick to the forums and listen to the thoughts of all those interesting people here, which includes you too :)

Ironically, to return to your original thought though, it is not our fault all the gathering is now on the forums and not in the game. After all, Cyan has driven its players to the forums to find out what is going on, to pick up on the story and to find company and interaction.

Do you see now why I think Ryan is completely wrong?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 8:48 pm 
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I agree with you completely Axel. There is a community that has been around far beyond the time of uru. But there is also this new community of uru players who are looking for the same thing we all were when we joined. They haven't ever seen the things we have. I think that is something I have forgotten. The folks who have been around a while want the game, because that is what we've had for so long. The new community gets to see that with fresh eyes as well as see our community. I also completely agree with you on the fact that not everyone is in it for the social aspect. I also think that (now reading back in this thread) it was and is completely unfair for the global countries participating in uru to continue to pay for it, even though they aren't getting exactly what they signed up for. Your explanation has certainly furthered my reasoning for submitting requests to Cyan for a better way to stay off the forums and in the game for updates. I also completely agree how we as our long exsistant community cannot accept uru for what it is and I stick to the fact that we shouldn't stop accepting our new community who are in the game looking for us to tell them of our ways. In a way, we are the D'ni, the new explorers are us back when this was a new experience for everyone.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:23 pm 
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JeffeJ5005 wrote:
I also completely agree how we as our long exsistant community cannot accept uru for what it is and I stick to the fact that we shouldn't stop accepting our new community who are in the game looking for us to tell them of our ways. In a way, we are the D'ni, the new explorers are us back when this was a new experience for everyone.


You got me. Now that I cannot argue with. At all. Very nicely put. :D

I always enjoyed the thought of us being the D'ni, our community, our culture carrying forth that legacy. That's precisely the reason why I cannot accept what has been happening any longer.

On that note, this thread is becoming a little unwieldy for newcomers. So I will edit the original post to include a summary of some of our findings here. I'll start with the concrete suggestions we have come up with.

To date, this appears to me:

Axel:
A Season One Retrospective

Marten:
Consequences should enrich the game experience, not lessen it.
(needs more specification in my mind)

Texana:
Story elements should be made persistent.
(Many have put this one forward, but Texana gave a nice example of how this could be done elegantly.)

Am I missing something obvious? I think Marten's suggestion needs to be given a good example and a suggestion
of implementation like Texana's. Care to have a go Marten?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:37 pm 
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Axel wrote:
Ironically, to return to your original thought though, it is not our fault all the gathering is now on the forums and not in the game. After all, Cyan has driven its players to the forums to find out what is going on, to pick up on the story and to find company and interaction.

Do you see now why I think Ryan is completely wrong?

No, Ryan isn't wrong, he's right. You see, he say that when you log into the game, you can ask others what happened, because there's a community in the game... People aren't forced by Cyan to go to forums, they can also get information from people in the game. I agree that the information on the internet is better than if you ask people in the cavern, but that doesn't mean that Cyan forces us to go to forums. Furthermore, Ryan explains in his interview that Cyan would also like the explorers to be able to write journals in the game. This could also bring more information in the cavern.

@JeffeJ5005, good post! :)

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:53 pm 
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I agree with you JeffeJ5005 but there is one thing I don't want to see happen. I don't want to see the old guard players standing around telling the kids about the old days that are gone. Those days should not be GONE. They should be growing. It seems like many of us that have been around a long while are explaining to new players how great the game was/will be. That's a strong note Alex is trying to get across too I think. The stories about what came before should be enhancing the new stories going on.

I don't want a day when we explain to the new player how "back in the old days of Telly, Kadish, and Gahreesen we had story and big concepts and everything that was great. Now you kids only have Pods, Gardens, and DRC squables."

I'm not saying that's what I feel it is becoming. I just want to make sure everyone understands that threads like these are designed to prevent that from happening.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:56 pm 
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Erik wrote:
No, Ryan isn't wrong, he's right.


Well, I am afreaid we can bounce this ball back and forth for eternity.

For me, the fact remains, that in literature, since time eternal, and in games show is always far superior to tell. Therefore, having second hand experiences, or the inconvenience of having to ask somebody about something you had little chance to see first hand is an abyssmal choice in storytelling or game design.

Furthermore, to place the burden of actually distributing the story onto the player's themselves, whether in-game or in the forums is just plain lazy, disappointing and ultimately counter-productive, since you will have no players left if it is continued. That's why Ryan is wrong.

Tag, you're it :P

EDIT: Changed the OP to reflect some of our results.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 10:43 pm 
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Axel wrote:
Axel:
A Season One Retrospective

Now is not the time to succumb to PC pressures, Axel. You specifically suggested a "post mortem" which, in this context, is a critical analysis of what worked, what didn't, and why. A retrospective is a superficial historical review of events over some time period, most appropriate to this time of year when people like to reminisce about things which happened in the year just passed. That's already being done in such topics as "The Story So Far" and vid's "The Restoration So Far." The post mortem, per your suggestion, would come from the developers and would be uniquely invaluable as a sign of awareness and communication about what Cyan agrees with us about and what they don't - and why. A post mortem would make a difference to our faith in their judgement and situation. Anyone can write a retrospective.

Axel wrote:
Furthermore, to place the burden of actually distributing the story onto the player's themselves, whether in-game or in the forums is just plain lazy, disappointing and ultimately counter-productive, since you will have no players left if it is continued. That's why Ryan is wrong.

Good. That's exactly what I mean by "misdirected responsibilities," above. The same goes for attempts to place the burden of Guild creation and management solely on the players while reserving absolute veto power. Frankly, like the Great Zero and lake project, Cyan has introduced the Guilds without the apparent capacity to properly support the effort. But perhaps that's another topic.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:03 pm 
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JWPlatt wrote:
Now is not the time to succumb to PC pressures, Axel.


You are right. Changed. It's just I often like to communicate as clearly and as directly as possible when I try to bring my point accross. I often wondered throughout this discussion, so far, have I crossed a line and started to become offensive?

I don't mean to be.

I also mean to be as inclusive as possible of everyone's input. Retrospective was one suggestion. But you are right, at this stage, there is no point to sugar coat the bitter pill anymore. This is about honesty. Both from us and them. I stand corrected.

I like the term misdirected responsibility. The answer to the question has much to do with Cyan's answer to what they want Uru to be at its core. Is this supposed to be co-operative story-telling? Or an alternate reality game (ARG)? Then it's fine to let your players carry the burden.

To me it seems this is still supposed to be interactive storytelling. If so, there is no excuse to shed the author's responsibilties completely.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:24 am 
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Axel wrote:
Time and time again, they have chose to stick to their specific artistic vision, developing it not for, but despite of the players.

While I understand what you're saying, and I agree, I'm not certain that is such a bad thing as you seem to imply. This is a characteristic of Cyan that extends back far before Uru. In interviews, the Miller brothers have explained that they didn't design Myst "for players", but rather, for themselves... they built a game that they personally felt would be fun to play. They were delighted and surprised when they discovered that a lot of people agreed with their concept of fun.

Elsewhere on this forum, someone suggested that perhaps Uru would be better if Robyn Miller or Richard Van der Wende were on the project. Most people replying agreed that it is too late for such a thing; but perhaps there is a lesson in the thought. Uru is not Rand and Robyn's vision; it is predominately Rand, Ryan and RAWA's. We shouldn't expect what they agree on as "fun" to be the same as Rand with Robyn. Nor has there ever been any guarantee that the Uru model of fun would ever find the same level of acceptance in the public as Myst's, though I'm sure Cyan wishes that it would.

Moving along to the next item:

Axel wrote:
(Ryan said) that he felt this was a burden better borne by the community and that they had no plans to do so! ... That is the most annoying, short-sighted and simply misguided approach to game design I have ever encountered.

On this point, I am going to agree more strongly with you. I've been working hard on a project for well over a year now, to create a video history of the events from 2003's Prologue. The project could never succeed without the assistance I've received from now countless explorers, but that doesn't mean the project has been easy; I have spent hundreds of hours thus far on the project (and I expect to spend more to finish it). I am not interested in documenting current events as well... when I'm done with the Prologue project, I want to go back to just being an explorer. I'm here to have fun. If I can bring some of my talents to the community now and then, I will happily do so. But I'm not going to let entertaining the community become my permanent job. Yet that seems to be the expectation I read out of Ryan's statement. Nor is that the first time I've heard such words, and it troubles me.

Last item:
Quote:
I think Marten's suggestion needs to be given a good example and a suggestion of implementation like Texana's. Care to have a go Marten?

I think Zardoz already had a good go at refining the idea. It's the sort of nebulous concept that I'm afraid to attach an example to, because it's like the KISS principle; it needs to be applied with a broad brush in every aspect to thinking through the game and story. It's a checklist item; when reviewing an idea, it should be considered.

But, here's an example. I've seen some players suggest, "Implement a way for characters to die." While this idea might enrich the experience for a minority of players, I think the overall majority, and especially those who follow the "You Are You" model, would feel that dying significantly lessens the game experience.

Implementation is simply a matter of engaging one's brain and thinking about it for a bit.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 1:02 am 
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I don’t post often but I assure you I read 99.9% of what's written on the forum and, not surprisingly, I feel like I know many of you well. I hope you won’t mind an unknown chiming in with an opinion on this topic.

I haven’t been involved with URU since the beginning. I came to the game by accident through a remainder bin at Staples (ironic in light of subsequent events). I bought it because I’d played the original Myst and hadn’t heard of this new Cyan game but the photos on the box seemed to promise a similar experience.

From the first fly-over shot of the desert I was hooked. I’d never conceived of myself as a character inserted into a game and initially the feeling of being an Avatar was awkward and the puzzles were difficult but I persisted in order to see more of this gorgeous new world. Maybe some of you remember how frustrating it was to be stuck on the balconies overlooking the cavern, to be so close, but unable to explore the underground city that you knew must conceal many hidden treasures. Do you still feel that way?

My guess is new explorers do but for those of us who fell in love with this game because of its ability to touch our sense of wonder, I think the marvel of discovery is gone and we miss it, terribly. As I’ve read through the opinions expressed by many what comes through loud and clear is a yearning for a return to that state of awe as each link to a new age and puzzle solved took us to a place that wasn’t only visually astonishing but had a greater meaning within the context of the D’ni story. That “aha!” moment when understanding dawned as a new vista appeared.

For me, this season has offered only a few of those moments, less than I’d hoped for, but enough of them to give me the confidence to renew my Gametap subscription because I want the original vision of URU to be realized. I want to be excited and thrilled by new puzzle content but I want it to come in tandem with new story elements that are a cohesive part of the whole, an integral part of the plot in whatever form seems appropriate for the context. Be it, as many of you have suggested, Ki mail, journals by characters and explorers, holograms, conversations with members of the DRC, and integration of the efforts of the IC explorers with the new Guilds, the Subterranean Exploration Group and all the others who’ve cleverly created new story with so few resources. I don’t see anything wrong with letting the story spill out onto the forums. It’s a simple solution to the inability of the game mechanics to support this type of communication; in fact I’d suggest reinstating the DRC website to use as originally intended, to give folks another means to keep up to date on the IC elements as they happen.

Finally, so much has been said by so many about what Cyan should have, could have or would have done, if only they’d had the resources, and much has been said about our responsibility to support them so that they can realize their vision. Many of you have offered thoughtful suggestions and worked creatively to do just that. In my opinion it’s time for Cyan to step up and make the effort to satisfy their remarkable fans by infusing the game with many more story elements in season two.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:07 am 
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Marten wrote:
Axel wrote:
Time and time again, they have chose to stick to their specific artistic vision, developing it not for, but despite of the players.


While I understand what you're saying, and I agree, I'm not certain that is such a bad thing as you seem to imply. This is a characteristic of Cyan that extends back far before Uru. In interviews, the Miller brothers have explained that they didn't design Myst "for players", but rather, for themselves... they built a game that they personally felt would be fun to play. They were delighted and surprised when they discovered that a lot of people agreed with their concept of fun.


Good point. Hard to answer without getting a bit philosophical. It is every artist's right (some would even say duty!) to go against the grain. In fact, without people like Cyan to think outside of the box, taking risks and continously pushing the envelope we would all play very dull games, watch very dull TV shows and generally be worse off for it.

It gets trickier when you don't create art for art's sake, but also have a responsibility to your employees, investors and customers while creating art with a significant business interest. If you push it too far, people lose jobs, customers feel mislead or even cheated, investors withhold funds, etc.

By all means, I would feel cheated if Cyan didn't try to paint outside the box, wouldn't take risks in their creation or just gave me what I already had 15 years ago when Myst came out. That goes without saying.

I think one major problem was that the development cycles grew exponantially longer, the exploded budgets along with them, and so did the people involved. I might be a little off on the numbers, correct me please if you remember them more accurately:

Myst took a team of four (?) people roughly two years to complete (1991-1993)

Riven took a team of 20 (?) people roughly four years to complete (1993 - 1997)

Uru took a team of 50 (?) people roughly six (!) years to complete (1997-2003)

Cyan has always stated that End of Ages was their fastest Myst ever, roughly taking one year to complete.

Of course, this is no measure of man-hours so not everyone was always working full-time on Uru. There was RealMyst in between there somewhere as well. There were very likely times with little development and heavy specification, tooling up times, scaling down times, etc. Anyway, the proportions look like I remember them.

With each person and each year you add to your project, the cost and the resultant risk increases dramatically. Myst was an astounding success, I think Riven performed admirably for a sequel. Somewhere along the end of Uru's development Cyan ran out of budget and had to get money from Ubi to complete the project. I am fairly certain that it did not offset its production cost in sales, and subscriptions never happened. Cyan had to briefly close its doors over it.

Through-out most of Uru's six year development trajectory we knew very little about it, save for it to be an online version of Myst. For many even that little rang alarm bells, since they were very sceptical about a fundamentally story-rich, single-player experience even working in a multi-player environment at all. No one knew what was to be superior about it, save for the appealing idea of getting endless content added to it over time. Some people saw it in a pre-beta state and had expressed to be wary of this being a huge mistake, while others remained very enthusiastic. I had been pitching a D'ni themed RPG idea to Chris Brandkamp together with a bunch of other really cool and talented people, and while Cyan of course couldn't persue this during so frantic a time, we had some neat discussions with them about role-playing, online interactions and just the darn, huge potential of the thing. So, for me, at least I was very much hooked on where they wanted to go.

I first saw it in second beta, when the Ubi thing had already happened, and when Uru was being re-tooled for Uru:Prime. I think mszv will remember that while I wrote as furiously about it back then as I do right now, I was shocked to see that this is what we had been waiting for for six years. Of course, at that point very little could be changed about it. I remember a long discussion I had with RAWA where he explained just why the single-player experience was so hollow and story-less. Lots of puzzles and interactions were retro-fitted into environments never designed to be story vehicles at all.

And before it even began, it was shut down. Many of us saw that coming. I didn't think it would fly after beta, but it was never even given half a chance, and I didn't think it would happen after just four weeks! Then again, it was decided apparently even before launch. Just imagine the crushing blow of six years of hard work just fizzling into something you had never even intended to be given to the customer like that. Heart breaking.

Now, after this nostalgic detour comes my point. There has been so much written about Uru in the meantime. So much discussion, so much criticism, so many suggestions. And sadly, so much more time for the competition to roll out their shiny, new toys.

t seems to me that in all this time, Cyan didn't re-think their vision, didn't take a good, hard look at the great strides being taken in other games. They basically started Season One at the point where prologue had left off. With pretty much the same approach. I cannot even fault them so much for it, because I have a feeling they wanted to test whether their original vision was sound.

I think the good thing about Season One is that it has taken away that horrible uncertainty following the first launch. Back then nobody knew whether this could have taken off spectacularly. I think we now know that it probably wouldn't have. Even with the benefit of a bigger budget, larger team and faithful distributor, the concept of real-life, exclusive story-telling will not work in a mass market. It doesn't even really work when your audience is made up of your most devoted fans.

That is the reason I started this thread. If they should be given the opportunity to continue, I think it is time to accept this fact, or to reserve Uru to the niche of an experimental, online art form, instead of a viable mass market vehicle of entertainment.

I always doubted their approach, but I also always applauded their guts to try anyway.

However, if one lesson is to be learned from all of this, I think it's that there comes a point where a project becomes so large, the stakes so high, that you cannot persue it with the same blind artistic abandon, despite what you know are tried approaches to gameplay and player enjoyment.

Please don't take this little rant as an 'I told you so' from me. I was as passionate about this as all of you. Maybe looking at it from a little bit more removed vantage. I do not claim that I could have done any better. But just to see it go down like this before my eyes, I can only quote Gollum: 'It burnsss usss.'

I think we haven't even seen the surface scratched of what can be done with interactive entertainment either. But I also think that some fundamental things about entertainment will always remain the same. People crave to be told stories. And great stories work best on an emotional level. And that can only be achieved when every player feels like he is experiencing it right there themselves.

There is a great Wired article featuring Robyn Miller, I like to quote to people. I like it mainly because I see the world through those same sociologically-tinged eyes. I'm not saying Robyn could have changed what had happened if only he had been there, but I am wondering if the rest of the gang understands the power of story as well as he does:

Mystery Man - Robyn Miller in Wired 7.10, Oct 1999
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/7.10/miller.html?pg=1&topic=&topic_set=
Quote:
The most powerful narratives are charged by a commonplace mystery - by watching characters go through changes, we ourselves are changed. "Story molds us," he says. "There's hardly anything we change our minds about because we're convinced of it by a logical argument. Story makes us who we are."


This is exactly what should be at the heart of everything. There has got be meaning to every artifact in even an imaginary world. Story is the foundation of culture. The vision of a 'real' city will not emerge by people congregating and playing out their own little tales. There has to be meaning in every stone in that city first. And it needs to be experienced first-hand, seen ... not talked about.

EDIT:
darn, I could have just gone to bed early and then have this endless post be: What Amrita said ;)

Excellent post Amrita, I agree wholeheartedly and it really doesn't matter that you feel unknown. This thread is not an elitists' hug-fest. Welcome aboard ;)


Last edited by Axel on Wed Jan 02, 2008 3:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:37 am 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 12:33 am
Posts: 1182
Location: British Columbia, Canada
The recently released game Hex Isle took a handful of developers approximately three months to create. I know one artist who built nearly half of the game's levels and objects.


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