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PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2008 2:41 pm 
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I submitted this to the Guild of Writers as my idea of a teaching age. BUT, I felt the story itself was one I'd like to share with all of you.

My First Day At School

When I was a little girl, I remember the apprehension of going to strange places. None was so frightening than the thought of going to school, classrooms filled with children that I didn't know. But, in my seventh year, there was no other thought to be had about my development, I was going to school, whether I liked it or not.

I remember the orange light swelling up in the great lake that morning, and as I pushed the blankets from my legs, I piled the pillows under my knees so I could sit up as high as I could to pull back the shades of my window and look out onto the great city of D'ni. I could hear the footsteps passing over the stone in my home, and as I sat on my bed, cut from the stone of the room, I knew the day had come that I would face the great unknown. I remember my Mother and Father coming to reassure me that everything would be fine. I have to admit, I was very excited to go to the Great Library. I had been there many times before to link to ages where my family spent time away from D'ni. We had been to worlds filled with white sand beaches, odd looking birds and great oceans of crystalline blue.

My mother, at hearing my stirring, came into my room, helped me dress and took me down to the kitchen for a breakfast of home-made bread and gooey jam. I think I was far too distracted by the anticipation of the days events to eat much. So, noticing that my appetite was less than voracious, my mother prepared us to leave the house.

As we walked the worn stone up to the library, I could already see in the distance, the strange man that had come to visit my parents in our home just weeks before to talk about my education. My father bid him "Shorah" and presented me to him. I remember the kindness and warmth in his eyes as he asked me, "Scared, little one?" I feigned bravery as I looked at him and said, "I'm not afraid of anything." "Is that so?", he said, "Well, it sounds like you're ready, it's time to head off to the Literacy Age." He gave my parents a nod, my parents hugged me and told me how proud they were of me and sent me off with the man with the kind eyes.

As we walked into the Library, he said, "My name is Etha, I'll be looking after you in the Literacy Age as your tutor. Don't worry little one, you're not the first young person I've taken there. Everyone must go to it, it's how we learn how to read, write and count, even how to do our simple, yet daunting, D'ni Mathematics. Everything you learn to become literate, you do there. Have you ever heard of the Rehevkor?", he asked. I nodded. "Well, where we're going is a place that is kind of like being able to play with the Rehevkor." I had seen the Rehevkor in my house, occasionally my Father took it down so I could show him a word I had seen while out with my mother in the shopping districts and he would tell me what it meant. This strange man, Etha, was taking me to the place I could learn how to read and write. The thought of learning those things bothered me a bit because that meant I wouldn't be able to bother Father in the middle of one of his experiments or push shut the grand volume he was reading to sit in his lap and have him show me the beautiful glyphs that made up our language. But then, a bit of mischievousness welled up in me as I thought of reading to him, instead of him always reading to me, and the surprise it would be for him if I could do it. I looked up into Etha's jade colored eyes and said, "Ok, I'm ready to go."

As we walked through the Library, I saw families heading off for the common ages to take family trips, others, like the group, uniformly dressed in lime green, who, I could only guess, were part of the Guild of Chemists carrying packages full of test tubes and beakers heading off to study an age. I even saw a Crimson Cloaked man from the Guild of Legislators rush by to meet a group of colleagues that had already started to link through for what I could only guess was a lecture in a Guild of Legislator's Age.

Then, as we kept walking, we rounded the corner of one of the grand bookcases, in what looked like a well used area of the library, stood a short, yet simple, dais that had several tutors like Etha and students like myself, lined up and linking through to what I could only guess was the Literacy Age. We approached the dais and Etha was welcomed with warm greetings and was introduced to the other students like myself. The other children and I exchanged nervous glances, and before I could get too uncomfortable, Etha scooped me up in his arms and asked, "Ready to go?" I nodded reluctantly and he said, "You've linked before, right?" I nodded again. He said, "Ok, little one, then it's time to go!" He put me back down on my feet in front of the bookstand that had been set up to be lower than the other bookstands in the library. I could tell that many a student my age had been here in the centuries before me. The linking panel glowed warmly. It seemed almost welcoming. Etha sighed and said, "No use just staring at it, go ahead, link!" With that, I pressed my hand to the page and the warmth that glowed from the panel enveloped me.

The next thing I knew, I was standing at the end of a great hallway. We were inside a very large structure with columns that went as high as I could see. The walls were made from stone, just like at home, but they were a bit different in texture than what I was used to.

From behind me Etha said, "What would you like to try first? The Alphabet? Numbers? What would you like to learn first?" I had never had someone let me choose how I wanted to learn like that before, but I mustered up the courage and said, "Alphabet! I want to read to Father." Etha chuckled and said, "You're not the first to want to read to their parents, but it's a noble journey to go on. But you're right you know, no better place to start than to learn the alphabet...let's head to the Alphabet room." He pointed down the long hallway, and as we walked I noticed that there were glyphs above the doors we passed. Behind each door lay a mystery that I was curious enough to want to investigate. After passing more than a few doors, he stopped at one with a beautiful amethyst handle. "This is it", he said, and with that, he opened the door and we stepped through.

It was like entering a bizarre dream. On stands around the room, there were odd looking cryptex-type stone cylinders with glyphs carved into the stone. There were short ones that only held 3 or 4 letters to make words with, others were longer and more complex, that spelled different things. I asked what they were, and he said, "Oh, your curiosity has got you, doesn't it?" I nodded profusely. He said, "Those are the Spellers, but you only get to those after you know what each glyph is. See, after you learn your letters, we'll come over here and spell words. When it comes time for your spelling test, if you get your words correct, then it unlocks and you get to go on to the next word at the next station. Each one gets a bit harder, but, what you see at the end...Well," he winked, "I won't give it all away just yet." "Come on," he beckoned, "we need to start over here."

Etha stopped in front of a large board of sliding stones, I could tell that I had a puzzle waiting for me to solve, I knew at that moment the Literacy Age was going to be something I had to really try my best to understand. "Come stand here," Etha said, "it's time to start learning." He slid one of the stones with a glyph on it in front of me, and said, let's start at the beginning, this is the glyph that makes the sound 'v', go ahead, try tracing over the glyph with your finger." As my finger touched inside the grooves that made the letter 'v', the inside of it started to glow where I had just touched it. As I finished tracing it, the stone sort of spoke, it made the sound of the letter. "Now repeat the sound", Etha coached, and I made the sound of the letter just like the stone and Etha had. "What word do we find 'v' in?", he queried. I blurted out "Devokan!" He chuckled and said, "Right! Good job." Again he had me trace the glyph and say the letter and the sound. "Now what's the letter called?" "V!" I hollered triumphantly. He slid the stone to the side and slid forward another for me to touch.

On and on the process went, going through each of the 35 letters in the alphabet. After we were finished, I was so excited to get home. I did nothing on our walk back to the linking book but talk to Etha about the shapes of the glyphs and how wonderfully exciting learning from the "Alpha Stones" was. I asked how the stone could make the sound, and he just chuckled, "That's a story for another day! Just wait until we do the numbers!" I giggled with joy. "But what about the Spellers?" I asked. Etha chuckled and said, "One thing at a time, learn your letters, then we go on to building words. Remember, building words is like a surveyor sending a tone through the rock, we have to find just the right path to make our words, and that path is made by you learning how to write the glyphs!" We'll do that with tablets after you learn your letters. Would you like to come back and learn with me again?" he asked. Without a second of hesitation I said, "Oh yes! Please! That was great, great fun!"

We linked back to D'ni and found my parents waiting for me. I ran into my father's arms, and as he picked me up, I squealed, "Father, the stones can talk!" He chuckled and said, "Why yes, and the stone all around us has many stories it can tell, but only the ones you touched can make the sounds. But you'll have to make them talk again tomorrow and give them the words you want them to say." I smiled and asked if I could go back to the Literacy Age again, and my mother smiled, tousled my hair and said, "Of course you're going back again, it's your school! It's where you will go to learn every day until you are sent to the Guild Halls to study!"

Etha walked gently up to my parents and told them how well I had done, what enthusiasm I had to learn more. My father shook his hand and thanked him, and told him that I'd be back the next day.

I could go on for hours and hours about my adventures in the Literacy Age, but like Etha always said, "That's a story for another day."

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2008 8:18 pm 
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Shorah Sh'aeri

I love your idea for a Literacy Age - brilliant. I never really mastered the numbers or the alphabet in the other games and always had to cheat a bit in the Cavern by getting someone else to help me or to print out appropriate information from the Internet - so OOC! For newcomers to Uru who had never visited Myst or Riven then the mystery of the letters and the numbers must have been very frustrating as, other than the book in Relto that gave you a few numbers (page numbers), I don't remember anywhere else that you could get this information.

I also like the way you presented your idea as a piece of fan fiction - great story and very evocative. Awaiting the next chapter with interest.

Thanks.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2008 8:30 pm 
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Nicely done Sh'aeri. I, as well, await the next writing....

For those that are interested in the numbering system....

http://linguists.bahro.com/domahreh/les ... son07.html


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 12:26 am 
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Thanks y'all.

Quin, like you, I came into Uru without the knowledge of the counting machine in Riven. Only after the closing of Prologue did I go back and play Riven and Exile. That's when I finally learned how to count in D'ni and I can now read 1-25 numbers easily on sight after using them time and time again on graphics I've created over the years.

I'm under the impression that we retain the things we use in a practical manner, so to me, since I am a visual and tactile learner, nothing made more sense than to have an age where you use the letters in a practical situation.

I have always admired the linguists. I've had the DLF page bookmarked on my computer for a number of years, and I can only think that if we would have had an age that would have taught us the alphabet, we would have had a much easier time with the puzzles in Myst IV, particularly with the puzzle that had the names written in D'ni on the spines of the books in Yeesha's room, along with enabling us to read the family tree in the greenhouse.

Many a time, I've put up the RAWA signal for a word. But I do realize he is only one man, and the linguists that he has inspired inside our community are a treasured and very valuable resource.

To me, as a Canon Junkie and as a participant in the community, I value the immersion that the wonderful writers envisioned. I wish with all my heart to see the culture outlined in the Canon come to life with our help. So, to learn how to read, write and count in D'ni would add a layer of immersion that we all could expand on.

As a teacher myself, I've learned that people learn in different ways. Some people are auditory learners, some are tactile learners, others are visual learners. In essence, I tried to write the age in a manner that would cater to all forms of learners, adding in our puzzle heritage so that it would make the learning process that much more immersive and effective.

I had not thought of writing another installment of the story. It was just an illustration of how I thought the age would look. But after what y'all said, I'll have to knuckle down and work on it a bit. I just have to wait, as all writers do, for a spark of inspiration. I actually started the story late one night, and it just basically wrote itself, so I hope you'll wait patiently with me for a moment like that to come again.

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Last edited by Sh'aeri on Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 7:55 pm 
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what a fabulous story, sh'aeri!!! you MUST continue it!!

i agree with your premise and i think you're spot-on about there having been a literacy age! and, yes, learning the alphabet/language and the numbering system DOES help to make things more immersive - you're directly involved and connected and that is one of the things that makes all-things-myst so utterly enjoyable!!

your assessment that different people learn best by varying methods is also spot-on...wouldn't it be wonderful to see your story as a video? then the visual items could be fully appreciated!

please continue on with the story...i want to see what the little girl learns on her next visit to the literacy age! and, what's her name??

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:43 pm 
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Joclyn...

I was telling my husband the exact same thing last night...that little girl needs a name because she doesn't have one yet.

Coming up with Etha's name was an adventure in itself, I spent about an hour with a random name generator to find it, then when I did, it was actually much longer than just E-t-h-a...it was something like Etharen or something like that, so since that was the only one that appealed to me, I shortened it.

So, give me time...she'll get a name, I just have to find it.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:57 pm 
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Good job Sh'aeri! Look forward to the continuation of the story!


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:24 pm 
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I wonder if Etha is a relative of EthanEver? :shock:

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:11 am 
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Please continue :D it's a great story and storyboard for a Literacy Age.I love all those elements (different ways of learning) you weaved in.

And I hope one day a Literacy Age will be there! I always felt I missed something, I played Riven before Uru and was familiair with the existence of the numerals but never thought there was more to it. In Uru ppl directed me to the websites with information on the language. I taught myself enough to get through simple puzzles, but it would be great if it could be in game, interacting, playing.

In the meantime I'm very pleased to get D'ni Language Lessons from r'Tayrtahn, in There - not interacting with game elements or items, but I forgot how a teacher can help to learn, and it helps to (just) meet (in avie form).

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 9:07 am 
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QuinMaddox wrote:
I wonder if Etha is a relative of EthanEver? :shock:


Eeer, are you serious? Ethan is a Numbskull and as they say, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree :roll:

Great story Sh'aeri. I really would like to visit Literacy Age. Like that little girl, I also have much to learn :)

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 9:13 am 
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The little girl now has a name. J'nah. (pronounced J-Nahh) If you must know...I derived it from a very dear person to all of us, Janet. Most of you though, knew her as Pepsi. I can think of no better person to name that curious little girl after.

Her Mother is named A'tum (pronounced Ah-Toom), and since we know she makes Home-made Bread and Gooey Jam, I thought I'd put her in the Guild of Caterers. Plus, I just love the name Autumn, it's lovely and it has a lovely reference to a tree as it changes with the seasons.

Her Father is named Laris (pronounced Lahriss), it's Latin, it means "Cheerful") so I figured I'd make her father a Stone-mason. "...The stone has stories to tell.."

Anyhow, now you have the names that go along with the characters. As far as that goes...so do I. LOL

By the way Quin...NO...Etha is not related to ANYONE we know that is or has been a participant in D'ni 2008, 2009 or since the rebirth of Cavern in 2003. None of the names I have chosen for the characters, except J'nah, has anything to do with anyone we know. So please, don't saddle them with baggage that isn't theirs. ;)

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 8:25 pm 
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J'nah and her first pen:

Author's Note: This is a continuation of J'nah's story in her childhood where she encounters her first pen. It was intended to give details as to what I thought the three-dimensional modeled pens and their matching inkpots would look like.

As Etha walked through the door of the large room where I was seated at my desk, he carried an odd box. The box was covered in ornate decoration and I could make out a single word, some glyphs here and there amongst the leaves and scroll work that covered the small green case.

"What's that?" I queried.

"Oh, it's a surprise," he replied and placed it away from us on the desk, then moved to stand behind me and look at the tablet on which I was practicing.

"How are we doing on the multiple letter connections?” he asked.

I was trying my best, using a blunt wooden stick on the tablet, to piece together the glyphs to make the word 'sehltahn', or 'writer'. I guess I had not practiced as much as I should have, because the letters just weren't coming out right, the glyphs themselves looked choppy and uneven. I was displeased to say the least.

"Not good," I answered. He could see that I was none too pleased with how my writing was coming along.

"Have you been practicing?” he asked.

"Of course I have, but the stick just won't make the letters right," I said, "this tablet is wonderful, I do like it, but really, it's just that the letters won't ever come out right with me using this silly stick!"

"Is that so?” he asked.

"Yes, that's so."

I had been begging for months, ever since I had moved past the Alpha Stones and had solved all of the speller puzzles on the dais in the room, for a chance to write with a pen. Well, bringing this want up to my parents, well, they weren't too thrilled to say the least. “A pen! In the hands of a little girl! What were you thinking! You'd be more likely to poke your eye out with the nib than to make coherent letters using ink!" I could hear my mother's words in my head. Worse yet, my mother said that I'd wear more ink than I'd get on the paper and she wasn't about to have to go back to the market to get another school robe for me until next year.

Etha was a little bit more supportive. He told me simply that a person my age was usually relegated to the stick and tablet sessions over pen, ink and paper, at least until going off to the Guild Halls.

I could see what he meant. From what my father had said, well, the Guild of Inkmakers went through a lot of trouble to make the wonderful pigments to turn into inks and it was a very specialized thing to get the right ink for the right paper. Most of the time in the market district, you would see guildsmen from the Guild of Writers arguing over which ink to use in what kind of book. On one trip to the Market with my mother, well, there were two men who just wouldn't stop arguing, being as there was a descriptive book to be written and then the linking book, their argument over whether the ink should be sepia toned or black or even a beautiful emerald color went on for at least the two hours my mother and I spent in the district.

So of course, this made my small want to write with a pen and ink ever the more important in my mind. If those two men spent that much time arguing over the right color ink, writing with a pen and ink must be pretty darn important.

"So you're pretty frustrated with that tablet and stick, eh?” Etha asked.

"I'm ready to wipe the tablet clean again! I just can't get the letters right!” I told him.

"Well J'nah, then I guess it's time to open the box," he said.

He placed the green box before me. I made out the letters on the cover to read 'mahrn' or 'create'. I was very interested in the contents, and as Etha could see, that I could barely hold in my excitement, he pushed the box closer to me and I noticed the beautiful wooden clasp that kept it closed.

"Well, go ahead, open it, I'm sure what's inside won't bite you" he chided.

I placed my small fingers on the clasp, I flipped it upwards and opened the box. Inside lay the most beautiful pen I had ever seen, an inkwell, and several rolled pieces of parchment.

"What is it?" I asked.

"This is a pen box. It holds a pen, ink and parchment on which to practice."

"Wait a second," I said, "Mother told me that I'm too young to be writing with ink, I'd hate to wear it like she said and I probably will."

"No, I doubt that", Etha said with a smile, "Let's see how you do with it before we make a judgment of your skill with a new object."

Timidly, I reached into the box and picked up the pen. Studying it closely, the pen was made from what looked to be ivory, and in the ivory was beautiful ornate carving, depicting a small forest scene, that when I turned the pen in my hands, I could see more of the scene itself. The decoration went all the way around the barrel of the pen and I was amazed with its craftsmanship. At the base of the barrel, near the nib, there was a wide area that looked large enough for my fingers to rest on the barrel without touching the carving that decorated the rest of it. The pen was fairly weighty in my hand, and to tell the truth, my small hand had trouble holding its weight, so I grasped it with both hands, fearful that I might drop it.

"Is this for me?" I asked.

"Unfortunately no, this is the pen I was presented with when I first went to the guild halls to study."

"Wow, who made it?" I asked.

"Someone from the Guild of Pen-makers I would presume, but this box was a gift from my father, who is in the Guild of Writers. It belonged to his father and he passed it on to me, but it was the most beautiful gift I received when I was not much older than you." Then he paused for a moment, and then reached over to take the inkwell from the box.

Etha removed from the box a small turtle, carved from the same material as the pen. The turtle's head was a pen rest and the inkwell stood on the four pillar-like stubby legs of the turtle. When Etha removed the top of the turtle shell, you could see the swirling black iridescent ink held inside. I could catch a whiff of the ink. It smelled kind of funny, like the decaying leaves of a damp forest floor in some far off age.



The Lovers Age:

Author's Note: It's only taken three years to get to a point where J'nah has gotten some time with me...sorry to say, this portion isn't quite finished yet, but, I'm through the first part.

As you can guess, with my random time allotments solely for writing fiction, I've danced from storyline to storyline. The characters remain the same, but I've hopped from story to story over the last three years.

When we last left J’nah, she was a precocious seven-year-old going to school. Etha, her tutor, has been with her the entire way, even helping her into the Guild of Writers. We now pick up her story many years later, and along with being a full-fledged member of the Guild of Writers (where she spends most of her time collaborating with others creating new linking books), she’s also met someone special. I had to mature her a bit for the next part of her adventure, which of course is just an outline for a new age...but those parts aren't in there yet. I'm still devising how I'm going to place the puzzles.

So, without further adieu, I give you another slice of J'nah's world...


Work. It’s all I seem to do lately. Correcting the color of leaves on a tree, making sure the texture of the bark is just right or smells a particular way. This is my day, every day. However, I can’t complain, it’s good, hearty work that I find worthwhile. But, let’s face it, I’m clumsy, my beautiful red and black robe that signifies me as a guildswoman in the Guild of Writers is ruined again. I spilled ink on it and Master Nehlah was none too pleased with me over it.

“J’nah, do you know how long it takes to make that ink? You know the process that goes into it, yet you spill it like a clumsy child. Get yourself together and get your robe replaced!” raged Master Nehlah.

Yes, yes, I know how long it takes to make a pot of ink and I know how important it is, yet I just bowed my head in reverence to him and scurried out of the guild hall as fast as my feet could carry me to the guild clothier.

As I walked into the clothier’s, the kind old woman who ran the shop, Ahmee, looked at the enormous ink stain on my robe and said, “Another inkpot gone, hmm?”

I looked at her and smiled embarrassingly. “Yes, unfortunately Yahvo didn’t bless me with grace. As I was reaching for the Rehevkor, I got my sleeve hooked on my pen and over it went. Master Nehlah is none too pleased with me again,” I sighed.

Ahmee laughed with a warm twinkle in her eye, “Well, then we will make you a new one where the sleeves won’t get caught. Let me confer with Master Nehlah about a new design for your robe, we’ll see if we can’t make you something that will work with you better, but not violate tradition. Go home, I’ll send a messenger when I hear word and I’ll let Master Nehlah know where you are.”

As I turned to leave the shop, a tattered and torn guildsman from the Guild of Surveyors walked past me, unaware of my presence. By the looks of him, he had thrown himself into one of the rock tumbling machines the Surveyors often used while digging. The knees of his pants were torn; his tunic was a tattered and torn mess of dirt stains and ingrained gravel. Ahmee looked up, and just at the sight of him, she began laughing heartily.

Ahmee asked,“Tohan, what have you done this time? Get yourself caught in one of your digging machines?”

He laughed back at her. “Ahmee, you know I always seem to inadvertently do my best impression of an earthworm. Unfortunately, this time, I was surveying an offshoot from the tunnel we were digging and the rock gave way, sending me tumbling. Lucky for me, I landed at Master Veris’ feet. He picked me up, dusted me off, asked what was wrong with me and why Yahvo cursed him with having to deal with such a clumsy guildsman, then sent me over to you.”

“Well then,” Ahmee replied, “You really must meet J’nah then, she seems to land in trouble just like you do.” He looked at her quizzically until she pointed over his shoulder at me standing in the doorway. Tohan blushed when he turned around to see me standing there and said, “Hello, you getting into trouble too?”

I looked down at my ink stained robe then looked at his and said, “No more than you.”

At that we both chuckled, I gave a smile to Ahmee and said, “I’ll be waiting for the messenger, Ahmee, and it was nice to meet you Tohan,” and left the shop to go home.

Walking through the city, I marveled at the place I had been so lucky to call my home. Over the hundreds of ages I had helped to work on the linking books, the great city of D’ni was still my favorite place to be. The lake seemed to shine especially bright and I took a deep breath of cavern air to set myself at ease from the day’s mishaps and the pleasant meeting of the clumsy guildsman. As I neared the steps of my home, I braced myself to hear the laughter of my father as he saw my robe, for the countless time, stained with ink.

“Shorah!” I called into the house as I walked in the door.

“Shorah my little speller,” my father called back, and with that he walked into the entry way of the house, his glasses perched on his head as if he had just come back from an age. “What the…oh J’nah, another pot of ink gone? How many will you wear this vailee? Girl, you truly are a beetle aren’t you? You eat ink the way others eat food,” he laughed as he walked away.

At that point, my mother walked in and sighed, “Ok, off with that, go to your room and get changed, I’ll see if I can’t get that ink out of your robe. Did you go to see Ahmee already?”

“Yes ma’am,” I replied, “She’s contacting Master Nehlah to see whether or not she can make something more suitable for me since I keep turning my inkpot over.”

My mother looked surprised, “Why should you have a different robe than all of the other guildswomen? Can’t you just learn how not to turn over your inkpot?” It was then she sighed and said, “She’s right though, the robes they make you wear now have more writers wearing ink rather than writing with it. Just go get changed.”

I took the stairs to my room two at a time, just like I had since my legs were long enough to accomplish the feat. I took my ink-stained robe off and as I was replacing the regal red and black robe with my favorite cream-colored, flower-embroidered robe, I heard a knock at the door. I hurried to finish dressing and as soon as I did, I tore open the door of my room and went racing down the stairs, hoping it was the messenger Ahmee was sending.

When I reached the bottom of the stairs, I stopped abruptly. Instead of a yellow-robed messenger, I saw something that made me stand aghast; it was Master Pilanis from the Guild of Maintainers. My father at seeing him, roared with laughter and the two men embraced.

Standing back from the man, my father smiled and said, “Pilanis, my old friend, come in! What may I do for you today?”

“Well,” Pilanis paused in the doorway for a moment before he entered, after he did, he looked over to me, then back at my father and said, “It seems as my son, Tohan, ran into your daughter today.”

My father paused and looked over at me. At that, I went to the kitchen to tell my mother that we had a visitor and to keep out of the conversation between the two men as they walked into the house.

“Mother, Master Pilanis is here to speak to father. I’m afraid I met someone today, a guildsman from the Guild of Surveyors who seems to go through guild uniforms as quickly as I do. I didn’t know he was Master Pilanis’ son.”

My mother looked at me and said, “That’s nothing new, we meet people all the time, don’t let it worry you, just help me put together the tray to take out to our guest.”

At that, my mother and I worked quickly to put together some refreshments, a wonderful smelling tea that mother had brought back from one of the catering ages, some tea biscuits and some fruit. When we finished, my mother looked at me and said, “Go ahead and take the tray out and tell your father I’ll join him shortly,” as she went up to her room.

When I entered the room with the tray, the two men were laughing gaily about the news of the day in the cavern, of the tunnels being drilled to make room for the ever-expanding population of the city, the news from the lower city and its inhabitants and stories from the Guild of Maintainers on how they were doing on their patrols around the new ages we were introducing to the public through the Guild of Writers. As I walked in, my father smiled at me, “Ah, there you are J’nah. I would like for you to meet Master Pilanis. This is the father of the young man you met at Ahmee’s today.”

“It’s nice to meet you sir,” I said as gracefully as I could.

“Hello J’nah, it’s a pleasure to meet you,” Master Pilanis said, “You made quite the impression on my son Tohan. He came right home after he met you and that’s the reason for my visit today. Will you sit with us for a moment?”

I sat down next to my father and smiled. Tohan, for his ragged disposition when he walked into the store, had made an impression on me as well, but one I knew better than express to anyone.

“So, I hear you’re a writer,” Master Pilanis asked, “How do you enjoy your work?”

I cleared my throat before I answered, “I enjoy it very much, and my tutor Etha says I have a rare gift for phrasing, but unfortunately it gets interrupted by my inability to keep my inkpot from spilling.”

Master Pilanis laughed at that and looking at my father said, “Lahriss, she’s definitely your daughter, she’s got quite the sense of humor.”

“But it’s true,” I said, “I don’t understand it myself, but I often end up with more ink on me than in the book, but I do keep trying to be careful. I do love my work though. Words are my whole life, and I do love every age we create in the Guild.”

“And you’re very talented with them I see,” said Master Pilanis, “You express yourself very well.” At that he turned to my father and said, “Lahriss, how about bringing your family to my home for a trip to our family’s age in four yahr, it should be a lovely afternoon for everyone.”

My father smiled broadly, laughed and said, “I accept your invitation Pilanis, it has been far too long since we’ve visited.” After they shook hands, my mother joined us, looking at my father and said, “Lahriss, where are we going?” My father replied, “In four yahr, we’ll be spending the day with Pilanis and his family in their age of She’min.” My mother looked at me and smiled then looked at Master Pilanis and said, “It will be an honor to join you.” At that, Master Pilanis bid us all farewell and took his leave.

So that's it for right now. Thanks for reading. As soon as I figure out how to balance 12 credit hours, a full time job, a relationship and so forth, I'll add in more. But I will say this, my mind is grinding on how to place the puzzles I'm imagining for She'min.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 10:55 pm 
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Always wondered what happened next..I noticed my father offered encouragement back in 2008,,?\ Not that it's not here, but a link for the story without the banter may be nice to maybe re-direct people? ty

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2011 9:04 am 
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Sh'aeri, I'm so pleased to read more about J'nah and her family. The stories are vivid and ring true to life. Thank you!


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 11:51 pm 
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Posts: 379
Location: somewhere in the cavern
Thanks Charura, yeah, I'm limited on time right now, so there are some things y'all will find for me to flesh out...I have mush-brain right now from everything going on in RL so if you could do me a favor and pick out the quote so I know where to work from, I'd appreciate it. The one thing any writer will tell you, you can't get anywhere without a good editor and an experienced set of proof-readers. :)

Hugs to you Dot! I've been thinking of y'all...I love my cavern family!

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